CHAPTER 1


FONDANTS

In this chapter, we will cover the basics of making fondants, the types of candies that use fondants, and how to shape them. Also included will be several recipes for fondants of various flavours.

If you'd like to become a great candy maker, you must perfect making a smooth and creamy fondant. Fondants are the basis for many candies including chocolate centres, pecan log centres, and coridals to name a few. With the recipes that will follow, you will be able to make endless varities of candies, simply by varing the flavouring and adding fruits or nuts.

If you have ever wondered how the liquid centre gets inside a chocolate covered cherry, you will learn it here. Soon you'll be making your own. The "liquid" is actually fondant, and is firm when wrapped around the cherry. The juice from the cherry acts on the sugar causing the fondant to liquify days later, and only after being dipped in chocolate.

Most of the fondant recipes listed in this chapter will require you to stir them by hand, which can be a bit strenuous, but worth it. Unless otherwise noted, the recipes do not need to "age", but are instead ready for immediate use. Fondant can be made ahead and stored in the refrigerator or freezer. If you choose to make your fondant ahead, be sure to store it in either air tight containers or bags. The fondant will keep for several weeks in the refrigerator and for 3 - 4 months in the freezer. Freezing the fondant tends to make it smoother and softer due to a chemical change which occurs. Occasionally the fondant will become sticky and hard to handle. If this happens, use a bit of cornstarch on your hands while working with the fondant.

The basic ingredient list for fondants is short, as its the porportions of these ingredients and the length of time that determines the characteristics of the candy. The basic ingredients for a fondant are: sugar, corn syrup or cream of tartar, cream or milk, water and salt, with of course the proper flavouring.



Click on the recipe name to go directly to that recipe
Making Fondant
Shaping Fondant
Cream Fondant
Cream Fondant Variations
Water Fondant
Water Fondant Variations
Honey Buttercream Fondant
Honey Buttercream Fondant Variations
Boston Creams
Re-cooking Information
Mazetta (Homemade Marshmallow Cream)

MAKING THE FONDANT

Using a heavy saucepan, place the liquid ingredients in the pan first, then the sugar. This helps to eliminate sugar crystals on the sides of the pan. Sugar crystals left on the side of the pan can totally destroy the consistency and texture of your fondant.

Cook the fondant to the specified temperature, and immediately pour it into the cooling pan WITHOUT SCRAPING. Cool it as quickly as possible, either in the refrigerator or outside if its cold out. Do NOT cool the candy in the freezer.

When the bottom of the pan is no longer warm,begin to stir it with a wooden spoon. Stirring it just fast enough to to the it moving.

If you cooled it too long it will be hard to stir, place it in a warm place for a few minutes, until it is easy to stir. If you didn't cool it long enough, you will end out with a grainy finished product. Trial and error will help you determine the approperiate length of time for cooling.

If you are making an entire batch the same flavour, you can do this at any time during the stirring process. If you are using several flavourings, allow the fondant to set, then flavour each seperately, working the flavourings and colours in with your hands. Be sure to thoroughly wash your hands between batches as the flavourings are strong and could transfer to the other portion which is intended on having a different flavour.

Stir the fondant until it looses its shine, and begins to set. It will resemble a thick frosting when it reaches this point. This generally takes between 30 and 40 minutes, but can happen as quickly as 15 minutes.

Once the fondant is set, flavoured, and coloured, you are ready to either store it, or use it. If your storeing it, be sure to use air tight containers and immediately refrigerate or freeze it. If your going to use it, its time to shape it.



SHAPING YOUR FONDANT

For chocolate centers, fondant that will be dipped in tempered chocolate, pinch off a piece that is about the size of a golf ball. Roll it out into a rope-shape about 1/2 inch thick. Using a table knife, cut the fondant into 1 inch chunks. Next, you will roll these chunks into balls, using the palms of your hands, and placing them on a waxed paper-lind tray. Once these are all rolled and on the tray, you will want to use your finger tips, and slightly flatten the balls. This gives them a more professional look when dipped in chocolate or coating.


Use this basic recipe to make a variety of flavoured centres for dipped chocolates.

CREAM FONDANT

1 cup whipping cream
1/2 cup milk
1/3 cup light corn syrup
4 cups sugar
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup of Mazetta (recipe to follow) or marshmallow creme, optional
Flavouring and/or nuts, optional

Set aside a 9"x13" ungreased baking pan. In a heavy 4 quart saucepan, combine the cream, milk, corn syrup, sugar and salt. Place over a medium-high heat and stir occasionally with a wooden spoon until mixture comes to a full boil. If any sugar crystals are present, wash down the sides of the pan with a wet pastry bursh.

Clip on the candy thermometer. Cook syrup to 238F (115C) or soft-ball stage. Remove from heat, without stiring or scraping, pour into baking pan. Place in the refrigerator, or other cool area.

When the bottom no longer feels warm, begin stirring findant with a wooden spoon. If desired, after 15 minutes of stirring, add Mazetta or marshmallow creme. If you intend on flavouring and/or adding nuts, you can do this anytime after the Mazetta has been added. Continue stirring until the fondant becomes very stiff and looses its shine.

If it is too stiff to handle, break off small pieces and work them in you hands. If this doesn't cause it to soften a bit, you may have overcooked it. Refer to the instructions for what to do when overcooked. On the same note, if you have stirred it for an hour and its still not set, allow it to rest unstirred for a few minutes. This will sometimes cause the fondant to begin the crystallization process. If resting it doesn't work, it may be undercooked. Refer to the instructions for recooking.

Please note: The instructions for how to correct both overcooked and undercooked, will follow.

Cream Fondant Flavor Variations:
The following variations are based on flavouring an entire batch one flavour. So if you intend to make several flavours from one batch, adjust amounts accordingly.


Flavour Desired: Add:
Vanilla/Vanilla Nut Add 1 Tablespoon vanilla and 1 cup chopped pecans or walnuts
Black WalnutAdd 1 Tablespoon vanilla, 1/4 teaspoon black walnut extract and 1 cup of walnuts
Cherry CreamFlavour with 2 teaspoons almond extract and 1 teaspoon of rum extract
Cherry NutAdd 2 teaspoons almond extract, 1 teaspoon rum extract, 1/2 cup of chopped candied cherries, and 1 cup of chopped pecans, walnuts or almonds
Mint CreamsAdd 1/2 teaspoon oil of peppermint or 2 teaspoons of peppermint extract
Lemon CreamsAdd 1 Tablespoon lemon extract, a small amount of yellow fool colour and 1/4 teaspoon citric acid
Orange CreamsAdd 1 Tablespoon orange extract, and a small amount of orange fool colour and 1/4 teaspoon citric acid
Raspberry/Strawberry CreamsAdd 2 Tablespoons of raspberry or strawberry extract, 1/4 teaspoon lemon extract, a small amount of pink or red food colour, and 1/4 teaspoon citric acid

Follow the information in the opening of chapter 1 for shaping, storage, and using several flavours from one batch of fondant.


WATER FONDANT

Very good for mints or fruit centres-- this fondant actually improves with age.

1-1/3 cups water
1/3 cup light corn syrup
1/4 cup butter
4 cups sugar
1/4 teaspoon cream of tartar
1/8 teaspoon salt
1 cup Mazetta or marshmallow creme, optional
flavouring and food colour (variations follow)

Set aside a 9"x13" ungreased baking pan. In a heavy 4 quart saucepan, combine the water, corn syrup, butter, sugar, cream of tartar and salt. Place over a high heat and stir occasionally with a wooden spoon until mixture comes to a full boil. If any sugar crystals are present, wash down the sides of the pan with a wet pastry bursh.

Clip on the candy thermometer. Cook syrup to 240F (115C) or soft-ball stage. Remove from heat, without stiring or scraping, pour into baking pan. Place in the refrigerator, or other cool area.

When the bottom no longer feels warm, begin stirring findant with a wooden spoon. If desired, after 15 minutes of stirring, add Mazetta or marshmallow creme. If you intend on flavouring and/or adding nuts, you can do this anytime after the Mazetta has been added. Continue stirring until the fondant becomes very stiff and looses its shine.

If it is too stiff to handle, break off small pieces and work them in you hands. If this doesn't cause it to soften a bit, you may have overcooked it. Refer to the instructions for what to do when overcooked. On the same note, if you have stirred it for an hour and its still not set, allow it to rest unstirred for a few minutes. This will sometimes cause the fondant to begin the crystallization process. If resting it doesn't work, it may be undercooked. Refer to the instructions for recooking.

Please note: The instructions for how to correct both overcooked and undercooked, will follow.

Water Fondant Flavour Variations:
Flavour Desired: Add:
Mint CreamsAdd 1/4 teaspoon oil of peppermint and 6 drops of food colour
Orange CreamsAdd 1-1/2 teaspoons of orange extract 1/4 teaspoon of citric acid and 4 drops of orange food colour
Raspberry CreamsAdd 1-1/2 teaspoons raspberry extract, 1/4 teaspoon lemon extract and 4 drops of red food colour
Coconut CreamsAdd 1 cup flaked coconut along with 1-1/2 teaspoons vanilla or coconut extract

Follow the information in the opening of chapter 1 for shaping, storage, and using several flavours from one batch of fondant.

HONEY BUTTERCREAM FONDANT

These are light fluffy centres and do improve with age. There are also several flavour variations too.

1-1/3 cups whipping cream
2/3 cup milk
1/4 cup mild, light honey
2 Tablespoons Butter
4 cups sugar
1/2 cup Mazetta or marshmallow
Flavourings and/or nuts (Variations follow)

Set aside a 9"x13" ungreased baking pan. In a heavy 4 quart saucepan, combine the cream, milk, honey, butter, and sugar. Place over a high heat and stir constantly with a wooden spoon until mixture comes to a full boil. If any sugar crystals are present, wash down the sides of the pan with a wet pastry bursh.

Clip on the candy thermometer. Cook syrup to 240F (115C) or soft-ball stage. Remove from heat, without stiring or scraping, pour into baking pan. Place in the refrigerator, or other cool area.

When the bottom no longer feels warm, begin stirring findant with a wooden spoon. If desired, after 15 minutes of stirring, add Mazetta or marshmallow creme. If you intend on flavouring and/or adding nuts, you can do this anytime after the Mazetta has been added. Continue stirring until the fondant becomes very stiff and looses its shine.

If it is too stiff to handle, break off small pieces and work them in you hands. If this doesn't cause it to soften a bit, you may have overcooked it. Refer to the instructions for what to do when overcooked. On the same note, if you have stirred it for an hour and its still not set, allow it to rest unstirred for a few minutes. This will sometimes cause the fondant to begin the crystallization process. If resting it doesn't work, it may be undercooked. Refer to the instructions for recooking.

Please note: The instructions for how to correct both overcooked and undercooked, will follow.

Honey Buttercream Fondant Variations:
These amounts are based on flavouring an entire batch the same flavour. If you are dividing the batch, you will need to adjust the amounts accordingly. Colouring is a matter of personal preference.

Flavour Desired: Add:
Vanilla/Vanilla NutAdd 1 Tablespoon vanilla and 1 cup chopped pecans or walnuts
Black WalnutAdd 1 Tablespoon vanilla, 1/4 teaspoon black walnut extract and 1 cup of walnuts
Cherry CreamFlavour with 2 teaspoons almond extract and 1 teaspoon of rum extract
Cherry NutAdd 2 teaspoons almond extract, 1 teaspoon rum extract, 1/2 cup of chopped candied cherries, and 1 cup of chopped pecans, walnuts or almonds
Mint CreamsAdd 1/2 teaspoon oil of peppermint or 2 teaspoons of peppermint extract
Lemon CreamsAdd 1 Tablespoon lemon extract, a small amount of yellow fool colour and 1/4 teaspoon citric acid
Orange CreamsAdd 1 Tablespoon orange extract, and a small amount of orange fool colour and 1/4 teaspoon citric acid
Raspberry/Strawberry CreamsAdd 2 Tablespoons of raspberry or strawberry extract, 1/4 teaspoon lemon extract, a small amount of pink or red food colour, and 1/4 teaspoon citric acid

Follow the information in the opening of chapter 1 for shaping, storage, and using several flavours from one batch of fondant.


BOSTON CREAMS


Caramelized sugar is what gives this candy its delicate flavour.

2 cups sugar, divided
1 (12 ounce) can evaporated milk, divided
3 Tablespoons Butter

Pour 1 cup of the sugar into a heavy 9-inch skillet. Place over high heat and caramelize the sugar by stirring with a wooden spoon unti lit turns into a golden syrup. Please Note: Be very careful as this syrup is extremely hot and could burn the skin. Teduce the heat to low and, stirring constantly, add 2/3 cup evaproated milk.

Stir in the remaining cup of sugar, bring to boil and boil for 1 minute. Stir in remaining milk. Cook, stirring constantly, to 244F (115C) or firm ball stage. (If using a thermometer, hold upright and immerse bulb in syrup for accurate reading.) Remove from heat and allow the mixture to stand undisturbed for 5 minutes. Scrape onto plastic wrap. Pat into a log shape about 1 inch in diameter. Seal and place in the refrigerator, or slice ans serve immediately. Makes 50 slices or about 50 centres for chocolates.

Variations
  • Add 1/2 cup chopped nuts when candy creams
  • Add 1/2 cup toasted coconut when candy creams
  • Roll logs in chopped nuts
  • Dip in tempered dipping chocolate


REFERENCE RECIPES AND RECOOKING INFORMATION: (USED OFTEN THROUGHOUT ALL THE RECIPES)


RECOOKING CANDIES


Fondants, fudges and caramels can be recooked if they are under- or overcooked or if the candy "sugars", as long as the candy has not been scorched.

In a heavy saucepan, combine 1-1/2 cups water and the cooked candy. Place over a low heat and stir with a wooden spoon until the mixture is well-blended. Increase the heat to medium and bring to a boil. Clip on the candy thermometer and cook to the proper temperature as listed in the original recipe. Pour and cool per those instructions as well. As the old flavouring has cooked out, be sure to add more. Your candy will have a darker colour due to the increased caramelization of the sugars.


MAZETTA


Homemade marshmallow cream.

2 egg whites, at room temperature
3/4 cup light corn syrup
1/4 cup water
1/2 cup sugar

Using an electric mixer, beat egg whites in a large bowl until stiff; set aside. In a 1-quart saucepan, combine corn syrup, water and sugar. Place over high heat and stir with a wooden spoon until mixture comes to a boil. If sugar crystals are present, wash down sides of the pan with a wet pastry brush.

Clip on candy thermometer. Cook syrup to 242F (120C) or soft ball stage. Beating constantly with electric mixer, slowly pour hot syrup into egg whites; continue beating for several minutes until mixture holds its shape. Use immediately, or refrigerate in a covered container for up to 2 weeks.

Makes enough for 3 batches of fondant.


Sneak preview to next months chapter.

CHAPTER 2 TRUFFLES AND FUDGES